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Baron Delvin

Feudal Baron Delvin of Longford Westmeath and Annaly

History evidences that the Kingdom of Meath was given to Hugh de Lacy. His Barons were appointed throughout the old kingdom.  Baron Delvin or Gilbert de Nogent/Nugent was given the most western lands and was the only baron and lord in the Westmeath according to the Annals of Westmeath. 

De Nugent came to Ireland with de Lacy in 1171 and settled land in Delvin. De Nugent was awarded the peerage title of Baron of Delvin within the Lordship of Meath, a title now held by the Earl of Westmeath. The original Westmeath contained Longord County and also people of Delbna/Delvin.

The Original Grant by Hugh de Lacy to Gilbert de Nugent included all of the lands of Delvin or Delbhna. These Delvin tribes and clans of O'Fenolen or O'Finnallan existed in all of Westmeath and outside of Westmeath.

DelvinTribes

In 1621, the Baron was made Earl of Westmeath.  In 1996, the Earl of Westmeath deeded in fee simple his rights to honors and seignory of Longford which is the ancient region corresponding to the Principality of Annaly or Annalie which was controlled by the Chiefs and Princes of O'Farrell. Longford village was the old fort of O'Farrell. The Nugent family and O'Farrells and many other clans have intermarried over the last 800 years.

The Seigneur of Blondel has acquired the titular rights, honors, barony, and perquisites of the region of the Adminstrative County of Longford from Lord Westmeath who is the Baron Delvin.

NugentStemDelvin

 

King James granted the ancient seat of the Annaly region to Baron Delvin. 

Baron and Chief of the Castle "Lissardowlan as spelled today"

History of the County Longford - Page 60 - Google Books Result-

The Seat of The Annaly Chiefdom was Lissardowlan Castle.

 Lios na nUamhanach/ Lisnanagh | Logainm.ie  

See Map of Where Lisnanagh Is - " 1377.

 DelvinOnly

NOTES

 

That the Family of the Nugent  have been settled in Ireland since the Reign of King Henry the Second, as appears  by an ancient Grant, by which Hugh de Lacy gave to Gilbert de Nugent  all his Lands of Delvin,  by trie Description of •« Delvin  totam quam in tempore Hibernicorum tenuerunt O Finclani cum omnibus pertinentiis," to hold to him and his Heirs by the Service of Five Knights Fees:

That this Sir Gilbert deNugent,not having any Issue at the Time of his Death, gave all his Estates to his Brother Richard, by the following Instrument: "De omnes conquestes et tenementa mea; viz4, Baroniam deDelvin,&c. quae quandum O Finclani et alii habuerunt fratri et consanguineo meo Ricard' de Capello deNugent:"

That this Richard deNugenthad Issue only OneDaughter,Rosa, who married John or Jones, into whose Family the Barony ofDelvinappears to have passed by this Marriage, for in 46th Edw. 3d, Anno Dom. 1371, John Fitz John was summoned to Parliament by Writ, dated at Dublin, 13th February in that Year, as Baron ofDelvin:

That this John Fitz John had Issue only One Daughter, Catherine, who married Sir WilliamNugentof Balrath, by which Means the Family ofNugentagain acquired the Barony ofDelvin,for it appears that this Sir WilliamNugentwas summoned to ParliamentbyWrit as Baron ofDelvin,and is commonly called the First Baron ofDelvin:

That this Sir WilliamNugentleft Two Sons, Richard his eldest Son, who succeeded him as Baron ofDelvin,andhavingmarried Catherine Daughter of Thomas Drake, had Issue JamesNugenthis eldest Son, and several other Children:

That this JamesNugent,who succeeded his Father, and thereby became the Third Baron ofDelvin,married Elizabeth, elder Daughter and Coheir of Sir Robert Hollywood of Artane in the County of Dublin, and had Issue Three Sons, Christopher his eldest Son, and Successor in the Barony ofDelvin,RobertNugent,who settled at Drumcree in the County of WTestmeath, and LavallinNugentof Dysert, or Dysart, in the same County, from whom the present Claimant is descended:

That this Christopher was the 4th Baron ofDelvin,married Elizabeth (or Anne) Daughter of Sir Robert Preston of Gormanstoun, by whom he had Issue Sir RichardNugent,who succeeded him, and was the 5th Baron ofDelvin:

That this Sir RichardNugent,who lived in the Reign of King Henry the 6th and King Edward 4th, married the Lady Elizabeth Daughter of Gerald Fitz Gerald Earl of Kildare, by whom he had Issue Christopher the 6th Baron ofDelvin,who sat in the Parliament which was held at Trim in the Reign of Richard 3d:

That Christopher the 6th Baron ofDelvinwas succeeded by his Son Richard, who was the 7th Baron ofDelvin,and was summoned to Parliament in 1486, Anno 2° Henry 7th, and also in 1493; he was also summoned to the Parliament which met at Castledermot, 28th August 1498, but neglecting to appear was fined 40*. for Non-attendance:

 

Richard, Baron Delvin, who had summonses to parliament in the years 1486, 1490, and 1493, and was constituted, by the lords justices and council in 1496, commander and leader in chief of all the forces destined for the defence of the counties of Dublin, Meath, Kildare, and Louth.

 

That this Nobleman was made Lord Deputy of Ireland in 1527, and conducted the Public Affairs with great Integrity and Honor until he was taken Prisoner by O'Connor, at a Conference which he held with that Irish Chief in the Castle of Rathen. He died on the 28th February 1537, leaving by his Wife Elizabeth, Daughter to Lord Howth, Christopher his eldest Son, who succeeded him, and Sir ThomasNugentof Carlanstoun, Knight, Ancestor to the late EarlNugent:

That Christopher was the Eighth BaronDelvin,sat in Parliament 20th Elizabeth, and died on the 17th August 1602. He married Lady Mary or Margaret, Daughter of Gerald the 11th Earl of Kildare, and left Issue Richard his eldest Son, and several other Children:

That Richard the Ninth Baron ofDelvinsat in Parliament in 1613 and in

1615, and by Privy Seal, dated at Westminster, 22d November 1621, he was

(144.) createdcreated Earl of Westmeath, to him and the Heirs Male of his Body. He married Jane, Daughter of Christopher Killeen, and had several Sons, of whom the eldest, Christopher Lord Delvin, married Lady Ann M'Donnell, eldest Daughter of Randall Earl of Antrim, and died in the Lifetime of his Father, leaving an only Son, Richard, who succeeded to his Grandfather, and was the Second Earl of Westmeath:

That this Richard married Mary, Daughter of Sir ThomasNugentof Mayrath, Baronet, and by her had several Sons, of whom the eldest was Christopher LordDelvin,who married the eldest Daughter of the Honorable Richard Butler of Killcash in the County of Tipperary, Esquire, and Niece to James Duke of Ormond, and dying in the Lifetime of his Father left Issue Three Sons, Richard, Thomas, and John, and Three Daughters:

That Richard the eldest Son succeeded his Grandfather as Earl of Westmeath and Baron ofDelvin,but having died without Issue he was succeeded by his next Brother Thomas:

That this Thomas, who was the Fourth Earl of Westmeath, having adhered to King James the Second at the Revolution, was outlawed for High Treason in 1691 j but being in the City of Limerick when it was besieged by King William, and One of the Hostages exchanged for the Observation of the Articles of Surrender, his Outlawry was reversed, and he was restored to his Estates and Honors:

That he married Margaret, only Daughter of Lord Bellew, and by her had Two Sons, Christopher LordDelvinthe elder, who died unmarried, at Bath, on the 12th April 1752, and John the Second Son, who died unmarried in 1725, in the Lifetime of their Father, and Two Daughters, Lady Mary and Lady CatherineNugent:

That Thomas the 4th Earl ofWestmeath died on the 30th June 1752, aged 86 Years, and was succeeded in the Earldom by his Brother John, but the Barony ofDelvinfell in Abeyance between his Two Daughters the said Lady Mary and Lady CatherineNugent:

That Lady MaryNugentmarried Francis the 21st Baron of Athenry, and had several Children, of whom Thomas was the eldest, who upon the Death of his Father became Baron of Athenry, and was afterwards created Earl of Louth:

That Thomas Earl of Louth died in January 1799, without any Male Issue, leaving Two Daughters, Lady Elizabeth, married to Thomas Baily Heath Sewell Esqr, and Lady Louisa Catherine' Mary, married to Joseph Henry Blake of Ardfry in the County of Galway, Esqr, and the Daughter of a deceased Daughter who died in the Lifetime of her Father, and who married Lord St. Laurence, Son to the Earl of Howth:

That Lady CatherineNugentmarried AndrewNugentof Dysert, Esqr, who was lineally descended from James the Third Baron ofDelvin,and by her left Issue LavallanNugentof Dysart andTullaughan,  Esq1, her eldest Son, lately deceased, the Petitioner JohnNugentEsq1, Lieutenant Governor of Tortola and the Virgin Islands, her Second Son, Patrick AnthonyNugent,late a Captain in His Majesty's Service, and who died unmarried in the Year 1785, and several Daughters:

That the said LavallanNugent,in the Year 1799, preferred a Petition to His Majesty,prayinga Writ of Summons to sit in Parliament in the ancient Place of Baron ofDelvin,his Ancestors, and lately died without Issue, and without ever having been married, leaving the Petitioner his only surviving Brother and Heir at Law, who is now seised and possessed of all the Estates, Lands, Tenements, and Hereditaments of which said LavallanNugentwas seised and possessed:

And Petitioner therefore prayed as follows, to wit, that as he is lineally descended from James the Third Baron ofDelvin,and has considerable Real Estates in the County of Westmeath, and as the Two Daughters and Heirs of the late Earl of Louth and Baron of Athenry aforesaid have in them the ancient Barony of Athenry in Abeyance, and moreover are by reason of their Sex incapable of obeying a Writ of Summons to Parliament, he is the only Heir of Thomas the 4th Earl of Westmeath, his Grandfather, that can receive such a Summons, or do His Majesty the Service of a Parliamentary Baron: Wherefore he most humbly prays His Majesty, to grant him a Writ of Summons to sit in Parliament in the ancient Place of the Barons ofDelvin,his Ancestors.

8 In order to support the Case stated by the Petitioner, the following Propositions are necessary to be proved:

1st, That John Fitz John was, in 1371, in the 46th Year of King Edward the Third, seised in Fee Simple of the Barony ofDelvin.

2d, That Richard Lord Baron ofDelvin,who in the Year 1621 was created Earl of Westmeath, was seised in Fee Simple of said Barony. 3d, That Thomas the Fourth Earl of Westmeath, Heir Male of the said Earl Richard, was also his Heir General, and seised in Fee Simple of the said Barony ofDelvin.4th, That Petitioner is One of the Coheirs of said Earl Thomas, in manner mentioned in his Petition.

In support of the First Proposition, that John Fitz John was in the 46th Year of King Edward the 3d seised of said Barony in Fee, the following written Evidence has been laid before us, attested Copies of which we have annexed to this our Report:

An original Record of a Writ of Summons to Parliament on the Roll in the Rolls Office in Ireland of the 46th Year of King Edward the Third. This Record is much obliterated and defaced by Time, but there remains enough to show that it is directed to the Archbishop of Dublin, and summoned him to a Parliament to be holden at Dublin on Wednesday next after the Feast of Saint Peter and Paul; it then sets out a Writ to the Sheriff to return Two Knights of the Shire, and to warn certain Persons named to attend at the said Parliament, and then states that similar Writs were directed to the other Sheriffs, andamongstthe Persons directed to be warranted appears John Fitz John, Baron ofDelvin:

An original Record remaining in the Office of the Rolls of the Court of Chancery of a Writ of Summons, dated at Naas the 20th November in the 48th Year of King Edward 3d, directed to the Archbishop of Armagh, by which the said Archbishop was summoned to a Parliament which was then appointed to be held at Dublin on the Octave of Saint Hilary then next ensuing; and a Writ of Summons, of the same Date, to the same Parliament, directed to James Butler Earl of Ormonde; which said Record mentions that the like Writs of Summons to the same Parliament, Word for Word, and of the same Date, were directed, Comitibus, Magnatibus, et Proceribus, thereto subscribed, and amongst others to Thomas Fitz John:

An original Record remaining in the Office of the Rolls of the Court of Chancery of a Writ of Summons, dated at Thristledermott the 22d January in the First Year of the Reign of King Richard the Second, directed to the Archbishop of Dublin, by which the said Archbishop was summoned to a Parliament which was then appointed to be held at Thristledermott aforesaid on the Monday after the Feast of Ash Wednesday next following; which Record mentions that like Writs of the same Tenor and Date, with necessary Changes, were directed to several Lords, and amongst others to Thomas Fitz John:

An original Record remaining in the said Office of the Rolls aforesaid, of a Writ of Summons, dated at Trym the 11th Day of September in the 4th Year of the Reign of Richard the 2d, directed to the Archbishop of Dublin, by which the said Archbishop was summoned to a Parliament which was there appointed to be held at Dublin on Saturday the Morrow of All Souls then next coming; which Record also mentions like Writs of the same Tenor and Date, with the necessary Changes, directed to several Lords, and amongst others to Thomas Fitz John:

An original Record remaining in the said Office of the Rolls of Chancery of a Writ of Summons, dated at Dublin the 29th of April in the 5th Year of the Reign of King Richard the 2d, directed to the Archbishop of Dublin, by which the said Archbishop was summoned to a Parliament which was then appointed to be held at Dublin aforesaid on the Monday after Fifteen Days of the Holy Trinity then next ensuing; which Record also mentions like Writs of the same Tenor and Date, with the necessary Changes, directed to several Lords, and amongst others to Thomas Fitz John.

John Fitz John being named in the first of the Writs above mentioned, and

Thomas in the Four which follow, the Presumption, as we humbly apprehend,

is, that between the Times of issuing the first and second Sets of Writs above

(144.) G mentioned,mentioned, John died ,and was succeeded by Thomas, although Thomas is not in any of them called Baron of Delvin, there being in said Lists very few Instances of any such Addition as the Title of Honour, and as far as appears no precise Rule to regulate the Adoption or Rejection of it.

There being no Journals of Parliament existing in this Kingdom so early as the aforesaid Times, no positive Evidence to prove that the said John or Thomas Fitz John sat in Parliament in pursuance of the said Writs of Summons was or could be given; but from the Probability that such an Honor was not declined, and from the other Evidences herein-after stated, we humbly apprehend, that whether Thomas was summoned as Heir to John or in another Right, the Presumption is, that John Fitz John aforesaid sat and voted in Parliament in the 46th Year of the Reign ofKingEdward the Third, in pursuance of the said Writ of Summons, as Baron ofDelvin,and thereby became and was seised in Fee of the said Barony, no Barony by Letters Patent having been created earlier than the 11th Year of the Reign of King Richard 2d.

From the Fifth Year of the Reign of King Richard the Second, there is, for a very long Period, no Parliamentary Record or Document extant. In order therefore to prove the several Steps by which the Barony ofDelvindescended in the Family of the Petitioner, we were referred to an antient Manuscript Book in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin, entitled " Irish Pedigrees," purporting to contain the Pedigrees of many Irish Families. We attended in consequence at the said Library, with the College Librarian; and in a Chamber of the said Library set apart for the Preservation of antient Manuscripts, which have been heretofore collected with great Care, as entitled to a Place in said Library, we there examined the said original Manuscript, and the Circumstances on which its Claim to Credit are founded.

It is stated in the Books of the Library to have been in the Collection of Doctor Sterne, formerly Bishop of Clogher, and to have been by him bequeathed, amongst other Manuscripts, to the College of Dublin, and to have been in the Year 1741 received into the College Library, where it has, in common with other Manuscripts, been preserved from that Time with the utmost Care and Attention.

This Manuscript bears every Mark of Authenticity, and appears to contain much Information respecting the antient Nobility of Ireland, corresponding with their known History. Under these Circumstances it was admitted in Evidence by the House of Lords on the Examination into the Claim made by the present Earl of Fingall to his Peerage; and even without that judicial Determination of its Admissibility we should have humbly conceived it to be admissible Evidence in the present Case. In the first Side of Folio 22, in said Manuscript Book, is the Pedigree of the Barons ofDelvin,an attested Copy of which, and also of the Entry concerning said Book in the Catalogue of the College Manuscripts, both duly verified, we have annexed to this our Report. From thence it appears that in the 7th Year of the Reign of King Richard the Second John Fitz John was Baron ofDelvin; that he was succeeded by John Fitz John, Baron ofDelvin,his Son,, who dying without Issue, Catherine, his Sister and Heir, succeeded to the Barony; that she married WilliamNugent Knight,Son of NicholasNugentof Balrath; that their Son Richard Baron ofDelvinmarried CatherineDaughterand Heir of Drake, by whom he had Issue JamesNugent,who married

Elizabeth Daughter of Hollywood of Farbane; that James

died in the Lifetime of his Father, leaving a Son, Christopher LordDelvin,who married Anne Daughter to Lord Gormanstoun; that their Son Richard LordDelvinmarried Elizabeth Daughter of Gerald Earl of Kildare; that they had a Son, Christopher, who died before his Father, and consequently never became LordDelvin,but having married a Daughter of Lord Howth left Issue Richard LordDelvin.To confirm the old Manuscript in this Part of its Statement, an attested Copy was produced to us of an Inquisition taken in the 29th Year of the Reign of King Henry 8th, on the Death of Richard the Grandfather. It is there found by the Jury, that Richard then late Lord Baron ofDelvinhad died in the Beginning of that Year; that Richard then Lord Baron ofDelvin,of theAgeof Fourteen Years, was his Cousin and Heir; to wit, the Son and Heir of Christopher deceased, who had been the Son and

HeirHeir of the said Baron Richard deceased; and in the said Inquisition the Will of the said Baron Richard deceased is set out, in which it appears that Part of the Estate of the Family of that Time was Drakestoun, a Circumstance tending, as we humbly conceive, by manifest Presumption, to confirm the Statement above made from the said Manuscript, of the Marriage of One of their Ancestors to an Heiress of the Family of Drake. An attested Copy of said Inquisition is annexed to this our Report.

Richard, who thus at the Age of Fourteen succeeded to his Grandfather, obtained, in the 4th and 5th Year of Philip and Mary, a Grant from the Crown of divers Estates in the County of Westmeath, as appears by an attested Copy of an original Record of said Grant remaining in the Office of the Rolls, which attested Copy has been laid before us, and is hereunto annexed.

In a few Years after the Grant last mentioned, to wit, in the Second Year o^ Elizabeth, a Parliament Roll was made, which amongst other Things contained the Names of Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in a Parliament held in that Year by Thomas Earl of Sussex at the City of Dublin. This Parliament Roll was in the Office of the Rolls aforesaid so lately as the Year 17t55, for in that Year the Claim of the late Countess Dowager of Tyrone to the Barony of Le Poer was depending; and a Copy of it was then taken in the Rolls Office, and duly attested by the then Keeper of the Rolls, or his Deputy, and was One of the Documents relied on by the Attorney and Solicitor General of that Time, in their Report in favor of her Ladyship's Claim; nevertheless this antient and important Record is not now to be found; and where a Document of such a Nature has been lost or mislaid, it is not surprising that the Copy so taken and attested should likewise have escaped the Search of the Complainant, a Misfortune by which there is Reason to believe that the Claimant has been deprived of a Piece of Evidence which would support his Statement in the strongest Manner, for we have seen a Copy of that Record, which, tho' not attested, has every Appearance of Authenticity; it is preserved by the Family of Lady Tyrone in a Copy of the Proceedings and Documents in her Case, and amongst the Temporal Lords it mentions RichardNugentBaron ofDelvin,agreeing in the Christian Name with the Record aforesaid in the Reign of "Philip and Mary.

It appears from the old Manuscript above mentioned, that this Richard married a Daughter of LordGormanstoun, and that their Son was named Christopher, and married a Daughter of the Earl of Kildare. The exact Time when Richard died does not appear, but it must have been before the 24th Year of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, for there has been laid before us an attested Copy of an Inquisition found in Dublin before the Barons of the Exchequer in that Year (which is annexed to this our Report), whereby it appears that one NicholasNugenthad been then recently attainted of High Treason, and that Part of his Property was an Estate in Tail Male in certain Lands in said County which he held under a Grant made to him thereof in that Year (24th of Elizabeth) by Christopher Lord Baron ofDelvin; a Record whereby the said Manuscript is again confirmed.

In the 27th Year of Queen Elizabeth another List was made of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, Counties, Cities, and Borough Towns, as are answerable to the Parliament of this Realm. This List is circumstanced in all respects as that in the 2d Year of Queen Elizabeth above mentioned; and we have, as in that Instance, seen a Copy, which seems to be authentic, and contains the Baron ofDelvin,but it states no Christian Names. The old Manuscript states that Christopher died in the Year 1602, in Prison in the Castle of Dublin, leaving a Son, Richard, who is therein called Comes, and states to have been created Earl of Westmeath on the 4th of September in the Year 1621. The Patent of his Creation is not to be found, but in the First Volume of the Lords Journals a full and exact Copy thereof is set out, a Copy whereof is hereunto annexed, which agrees exactly with the old Manuscript above mentioned, and from which itappearsthat the said Earldom was granted to the said Richard Baron ofDelvinin Tail Male; and it is notorious that under that Patent the present Earl of Westmeath sits in Parliament at this Day, and has been elected one of the Representatives of the Irish Peerage in the Imperial Parliament.

(144.) We

We humbly conceive, therefore, that it is sufficiently proved that the First Earl of Westmeath was seised in Fee Simple of the Barony of Delvin from the old Manuscript; that Richard the First Earl married Jennetta Daughter of Lord Killeen, and that Christopher is in the Manuscript stiled Lord Delvin; and it is stated that he was married to Anne, a Daughter of the Earl of Antrim, afterwards the Wife of William Lord Slane, and left a Son Richard, who became Earl of Westmeath.

There are in the Journals of the Lords Two Lists of the Peers in the Years 1634 and 1639 respectively, whereof attested Copies are annexed to this our Report; in the former whereof the Earl of Westmeath is mentioned as one, and in the latter, Richard Earl of Westmeath. The Manuscript states, that Richard the Second Earl married the Widow of Lord Dunsaney's eldest Son, and had a Son, Christopher Lord Delvin, who died before his Father, leaving by his Lady, a Daughter of Richard Butler of Kilcash in the County of Tipperary, several Sons, Richard the eldest, who became a Monk, and consequently left no Issue; Thomas, who succeeded to the Earldom; John; and another Thomas married a Daughter of Lord Duleek. This is the latest Fact stated in the old Manuscript, and probably happened about the Year 1690. The Descent from the Second Earl Richard to Earl Thomas is stated in a Book kept for that Purpose by the Ulster King at Arms, and subscribed by Earl Thorflas, pursuant to a Standing Order of the House of Lords, a Copy of which Entry is annexed to this our Report.

The Petitioner then laid before us a Certificate from the Deputy Clerk and Keeper of the Rolls, and also another from the Deputy Keeper of Bermingham Tower, which are hereunto annexed, and by which the said Officers respectively certify that they have made diligent Search in their respective Offices aforesaid, and could not find any Enrollment of Letters Patent granting to any Person the Barony of Delvin; from all which, as we humbly conceive, it clearly appears that the said Thomas Earl of Westmeath was the Heir at Law of the First Earl of Westmeath, and of the ancient Barons of Delvin, and as such seised of the said Barony in Fee Simple.

The Affidavits hereunto annexed, of Richard Byrn of Queen Street in the City of Dublin, Gent", aged Seventy Years and upwards, of Christopher Fleming of Ballyboy in the County of Westmeath, Gent", aged 70 Years and upwards, and of George Mathews of Mullingar in the County of Westmeath, aged Ninety Years and upwards, were produced to us. The Substance of their Testimony is, that they knew the said Thomas late Earl of Westmeath and Baron of Delvin; that he was always reputed to be the Heir of the antient Barons of Delvin, and to have succeeded to the said Barony as such; that the said Earl Thomas died in the Year 1752 at a very advanced Age, leaving no Son, nor any Issue by a Son, whereby on his Death the Earldom of Westmeath descended to his Brother; that he had Two Daughters, Lady Mary and Lady Catherine; that Lady Mary died before him, having married Francis Lord Athenry, and left Issue by him a Son, Thomas Lord Athenry, afterwards Earl of Louth ; that the Earl of Louth died in the Year 1799, leaving no Son, nor any Issue by a Son, but having had Four Daughters, Lady Elizabeth, Lady Mary, Lady Louisa, and Lady Matilda; that Lady Elizabeth was married, first to Thomas Baily Heath Sewel Esq1, and second to Francis Duffield Esqr, and is now living; that Lady Mary died before her Father, having first married Lord St. Lawrence, and left Issue by him Four Daughters only, to wit, Henrietta St. Laurence, Isabella St. Laurence, Matilda St. Laurence, and Mary St. Laurence; that Lady Louisa is now the Wife of Lord Wallscourt; and that Lady Matilda died before her Father, unmarried; that Lady Catherine aforesaid married Andrew Nugent Esq', of Dysart and Tullaghan, a younger Branch of the Family of her Father; that she is dead, having left Issue by her said Husband Three Sons, to wit, Lavallin Nugent, who since died unmarried, John Nugent, the Petitioner, and a younger Son, since dead, unmarried, and Two Daughters.

Upon Consideration of the whole of the Evidence aforesaid, we are humbly of Opinion that Petitioner has proved all the material Allegations of his Petition—that the said Barony of Delvin is an antient Barony in Fee, and has already already been inherited as such by a Female; that the said Barony is now in Abeyance between Petitioner as the sole Heir of Lady Catherine Nugent aforesaid, and the Coheiresses of Lady Mary Nugent, to wit, the Lady Elizabeth Duffield, the Four Daughters of Lady St. Laurence, and Lady Wallscourt aforesaid; and that it depends wholly upon His Majesty's Royal Pleasure whether the said Barony shall remain in Abeyance, or shall vest in any of the said Persons, and whether His Majesty shall, according to the Prayer of the Petition, and for the Reasons therein mentioned, or any other, grant Petitioner a Writ of Summons to sit in Parliament in the antient Place of the Barons of Delvin, his Ancestors.

All of which is submitted to Your Excellency as Your Report, this
3d Day of November 1800.

(Signed) JohnToler.
JohnStewart.
St.George  Daly.

f No.5.

COPY of the Report of the Attorney and Solicitor General of Ireland on the Petition of AndrewNugent Esq., claiming to be One of the Coheirs of the said Barony of Delvin, dated 1814;

from the Secretary's Office in Dublin Castle.

To His Excellency Charles Lord Viscount Whitworth, Lord Lieutenant General and General Governor of Ireland.

May it please Your Excellency,

In obedience to Your Excellency's Order of Reference bearing Date at Dublin Castle the 24th Day of January 1814, whereby the Petition of Andrew Nugent of Portaferry in the County of Doun, Esquire, claiming to be One of the Coheirs of Thomas Nugent, Fourth Earl of Westmeath and Baron of Delvin, at whose Death the said Barony of Delvin is stated to have become in Abeyance, was referred to us; and Your Excellency was pleased to direct us to report our Opinion as to what might be proper to be done thereon; we have considered the said Petition, and have examined into the Facts of the Case; and we find that one John Fitz John was summoned to that Parliament or Great Council of Ireland which was held at Dublin on Wednesday next after the Feast of St. Peter in Cathedra, in the Forty-sixth Year of the Reign of King Edward the Third (1373), by the Name, Stile, and Title of "JohnFitzJohn,BarondeDelvyn." The said Writ of Summons remains upon Record on the Close Roll of the same Year in the Rolls Office of His Majesty's Court of Chancery in Ireland, whereof an attested Copy was produced before us.

We further find, that the said John Fitz John died leaving an only Daughter and Heir, Katherine, who became the Wife of one William Nugent, who was thereafter styled William Nugent, Baron of Delvin, as appears by the Plea Roll of the 14th of King Richard the 2d (1391), in which they are respectively stiled " WilliamNugent,Baron'  deDelvyn " and "Kat'inamux'emejus,j7Ua'  S$tiered'Joh'n's  FitzJohn'Baron'  deDelvyn." The said Plea Roll is upon Record in Bermingham Tower in His Majesty's Castle of Dublin, whereof an attested Extract was produced before us. We further find, that the said William Baron of Delvin was succeeded by his Son Richard Nugent, who in the Patent Roll of the 7th of King Henry the 4th (1406) is styled "Ric'oj??WilViNugent,fiFSfheredi  Kat'ineFitzJohn" The said Richard, in the Plea Roll of the 20th of King Henry the 6th (1442), is styled RicHNugent  mihtis,BaronisdeDelvyn ;" and it appears by the Plea Roll of the 23d of the same Reign (1445) (144.) H that the said Richard was Lord Deputy to James Earl of Ormond, as he is therein styled "RichardBaronofDelvyn,Depute  toJamysErieofOrmond,Lieutenant  inIreland" The Three last-mentioned Rolls are upon Record in Bermingham Tower before mentioned, wheTeof attested Extracts were produced before us. We further find, that the said Richard Baron of Delvin had a Son James, who appeared to have died in his Father's Lifetime; and that the said Richard was succeeded by his Grandson Christopher, Son of the aforesaid James, which is proved by an Act of Parliament enrolled on the Statute Roll of the 15th and 16th of King Edward the 4th (1476-7), in which the said Christopher is styled ChristofreNugent  Esquier,Cousine and HeireaRichard Nugent, tardeBarondeDelvyn, c'estassav'ftz8  heireaJamesNugent,fitzalditRichard." The said Statute Roll is upon Record in the Rolls Office of the Court of Chancery, whereof an attested Extract was produced before us. We further find, that the said Christopher Baron of Delvyn was succeeded by Richard Baron of Delvyn, whom we find sitting in Parliament by that Title in the 6th Year of King Henry the 7th (1491), as appears by a Book entitled CasesofPrecedence, and which belongs to and has always been in the Custody of Ulster King of Arms of all Ireland, and now upon Record in his Office, and which was inspected by us. The said Richard is also styled " RichardBarondeDelvyn" in the Statute Roll of the 8th of the same Reign (1493), upon Record in the Rolls Office of the Court of Chancery, whereof ah attested Copy Extract was produced to us; and in the great Roll of the Pipe of the 18th of the same Reign (1503) he is again styled "Ric'usNugent,Baron Delvyn," which Roll remains upon Record in Bermingham Tower, whereof an attested Extract was produced before us. We further find, that the said lastmentioned Richard Baron of Delvyn was succeeded by his Grandson Richard, who was the Son of Sir Christopher Nugent Knl, who was the Son of the lastmentioned Baron of Delvin, and who appears to have died in his Father's Lifetime, or before he had Livery, as by Inquisition post Mortem taken at Trim on the 2d of April in the 29th of King Henry the 8th (1538) the said .Richard Baron of Delvin is stated to have been succeeded by his Grandson as follows: "Ric'usNugent  miles,nup'BarodeDelvyn,obiit —(Two or Three Words are here from the Age of the Manuscript illegible.) Nugent  estejusconsanguineusheresvidel'z  flius8$Jieres Cristofori Nugent  miUt', filiiethered' p'dict' Ric'iNugent  milit',nup'BarodeDelvyn." The said Inquisition is upon Record in the Chief Remembrancer's Office of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer in Ireland, an attested Copy of which was produced before us. By an attested Extract produced to us of the Great Roll of the Pipe of the 4th of King Edward the 6th (1551) it appears, that the said Richard Nugent, the Son of Sir Christopher Nugent, and Grandson of the last-mentioned Richard Baron of Delvyn, had Livery on the 5th February in the 36th of King Henry the 8th (1545), in which Roll he is styled "Ric'usNugent, BarodeDelvyn,filius  8$Jieres Cristqf riNugent, nup'Barondeead'defunct." We also find him summoned to Parliament in the 2d Year of Queen Elizabeth (1560) by the Name, Style, and Title of " Ric'usNugent  mil',BarodeDelvyn" as appears by an attested Copy produced to us of a List of such Peers, Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, as were summoned to a certain Parliament held at Dublin on the 12th of January in that Year, the Original whereof is upon Record in the Rolls Office of the before-mentioned Court of Chancery. We further find, that the said lastmentioned Richard Baron of Delvin was succeeded by his Son Christopher, who is styled, "X'pqfero Nugent,Baroni  deDelvin, filio§hered'  Ric'iNugent," in the Memorandum Roll of the 10th of Queen Elizabeth (1568), upon Record in the Chief Remembrancer's Office of the Court of Exchequer, an attested Copy of which was produced to us. There is also upon Record in the Rolls Office of Chancery a Letter dated the 22d November 1565, written by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth to Sir Henry Sidney, the then Lord Deputy of Ireland, on behalf of the said Christopher Lord Delvin, in which his Father is also styled "thelateBaron;" an attested Copy of which Letter has been produced to us. It further appears, by a Funeral Entry upon Record in the Office of Ulster King of Arms of all Ireland, the Original of which was produced to us, that the said Christopher Baron of Delvin died in Dublin Castle on the 1st Day of October 1602; and by a subsequent Funeral Entry upon Record in the same Office, which we also inspected, it appears that the said said Christopher Baron of Delvin was succeeded by his Son Richard Baron of Delvin, who on the 13th May 1605 had Livery, as appears by a Constat thereof upon Record in the Rolls Office, of the aforesaid Court of Chancery, an attested Copy of which was produced to us, and in which he is styled "Rich'u' Nugentmilif, Dom'n' Baron'deDelvin, Jiliu'et  hered'X'pqferiNugentmilif, nup'D'ni Baron'deDelvin." We also find him sitting in Parliament in the 12th Year of King James the 1st (1613), and again in the 14th of the same Reign (1615), as appears by Two several Entries in the Book entitled Casesof  Precedence, before mentioned, upon Record in the Office of Ulster King of Arms, and which was inspected by us. The said Richard Baron of Delvin was, by Patent dated the 4th of September 1621, created Earl of Westmeath, with Remainder to his Heirs Male. We further find, that Richard First Earl of Westmeath made his Will on the 2d of October 1640, which Will is now on Record in His Majesty's Court of Prerogative in Ireland, an attested Copy whereof was produced to us, by which it appears that Christopher, eldest Son of the said Richard, died before his Father, as Richard the Son of Christopher, and Grandson of the said Richard the First Earl, is in the said Will called, "myGrandsontheLordofDelvin" and again, "mysaid  GrandsonRichard  Nugent"  which last mentioned Richard succeeded his Grandfather the First Earl of Westmeath, and became the 2d Earl of Westmeath. We further find, by inspecting a Book entitled LordsEntries, formerly belonging to the House of Lords in this Kingdom, and now remaining on Record in the Office of Ulster King of Arms, that the said Richard Second Earl of Westmeath and Baron of Delvin was succeeded by his Grandson Richard, Son of the Honorable Christopher Nugent commonly called Lord Delvin, who died in the Lifetime of his Father the before-mentioned Richard, the Second Earl of Westmeath; that the said Richard the Third Earl of Westmeath died unmarried in the Year 1714, and was succeeded by his Brother Thomas Fourth Earl of Westmeath and Baron of Delvin. By another Entry in the same Book it appears, that the said Thomas the Fourth Earl of Westmeath and Baron of Delvin died without surviving Issue Male, on the 4th of June 1752, whereupon the Earldom of Westmeath devolved upon his Brother John, Ancestor to the now Earl of Westmeath; and that the said Thomas had Two Daughters, namely, Lady Mary, who became the Wife of Francis Baron of Athenry, and Lady Catherine, who became the Wife of Andrew Nugent of Dysart, Esqr; and it was urged to us by the Claimant, that the Title and Honors of Baron of Delvin, being proved to be a Barony in Fee, did upon the Death of the before-mentioned Thomas Fourth Earl of Westmeath and Baron of Delvin become in Abeyance among the Issue of his Two Daughters, the said Lady Mary and Lady Catherine. It was also proved before us, that the said Lady Mary, who became the Wife of the said Francis Baron of Athenry, was by him Mother of Thomas Baron of Athenry and Earl of Louth, who died, leaving Three Daughters his Coheirs; namely, Lady Elizabeth, who became the Wife first of Thomas Sewell Esq1, and secondly of Francis Duffield Esqr; Lady Marcy, who became the Wife of William Earl of Howth; and Lady Louisa, who became the Wife of Joseph Henry Baron Wallscourt; that the said Lady Catherine, who became the Wife of the said Andrew Nugent of Dysart, Esqr, had Issue by him Three Sons, namely, Lavalin, John, and Patrick Anthony, who all died without Issue, and Two Daughters her Coheirs, namely, Margaret and Barbara; Margaret, the eldest Daughter and Coheir, became the Wife of Andrew Savage of Portaferry in the County of Down, Esq1, who died leaving Issue Patrick his eldest Son and Heir, who left Issue his Son and Heir Andrew Nugent of Portaferry, Esq1, the present Claimant, as One of the Coheirs of the before-mentioned Thomas Fourth Earl of Westmeath and Baron of Delvin; Barbara, the Second Daughter and Coheir of the said Lady Catherine, became the Wife of James O'Rielly of Ballinlough in the County of Westmeath, Esq1, and by him was Mother of the present Sir Hugh Nugent Baronet.

Upon the whole of the Case we are of Opinion, that a Barony in Fee has been fully proved to have existed in the Person of Thomas the Fourth Earl of Westmeath and Baron of Delvin; and further we are of Opinion, that Andrew Nugent Esqr, Your Excellency's Petitioner, has proved himself to be One of the Coheirs of the said Earl Thomas, and has to our Satisfaction fully (J 44.) made made out the Statement of his Petition; at the same Time, agreeably to the Usage in these Cases, we are of Opinion, that the Case may be properly submitted to the House of Lords of the United Kingdom, if His Majesty should be graciously pleased so to do.

  

All which is humbly submitted as the Opinion of Your Excellency's most obedient humble Servants,

 

CITATION

The Castle of Lios-ard-ablha or Lis-Ard-Alba (now only marked by the moat of Lisserdowling) was erected by John O’Farrell, Lord of Annaly.   On Page 59 and 60 of the history of Longford by James Farrell, the Castle, Bawne and Town and Lands of Lisserdawle and 8 Cartrons ( 80 acres each) are granted to Richard Nugent Baron Delvin along wiht the Annalie Monastery of Inchemore or Inismore along with cottages and land of the Island.

 Delvin and Delbna - The Tribes and The Regions

Delbna or Delvin
Geoffrey Keating describes seven areas referred to as Delbna, that is Dealbhna Mhor, Dealbhna Bheag, Dealbhna Eathra, Dealbhna Iarthair Mhidhe, Dealbhna Shithe Neannta, Dealbhna Chuile Fabhair, and Dealbhna Thire da Loch in Connaught.


At least four regions in southern Uí Neill territory are denoted as Delvin or Delbna. Around the 12th century these included: Mac Cochlain (Mac Coughlan) of Delbna bEthra (Garrycastle, Co. Offaly), Ua Finnallain (O'Finnallan, Fenelon) of Delbna Mor (Delvin barony, Westmeath), Ua Scolaidhe (O'Scully) of Delbna Iathair (Delvin and Rathconrath baronies, Westmeath), Ua Maoil Challan (Mulholland) in Delbna Bec (Fore barony, co. Westmeath).

In addition, Delbna regions were noted in the province of Connacht, one of those cited as Delbna of the Two Lakes (Dealbhna Thire da Loch) near the River Shannon. Reference to this is under (see Connaught).



The annals cite for Delbna:

  • For 751, The shipwreck of the Dealbhna Nuadhat on Loch Ribh, with their lord, Diumasach. 
  • For 751, The battle of Bealach Cro was gained by Crimhthann over the Dealbhna of Uí Maine, in which was slain Finn, son of Arbh, Lord of Dealbhna, at Tibra Finn, and the Dealbhna were slaughtered about him. From this are named Lochan Bealaigh Cro, and Tibra Finn. The Uí Maine were contending with them for the cantred between the Suca (the River Suck) and the Sinainn (the River Shannon), for this was called the cantred of Dealbhna [Nuadhat ]. 
  • For 827, Cearbhall, son of Finnachta, lord of Dealbhna Beathra, died. 
  • For 839, The plundering of Feara Ceall and Dealbhna Eathra by Niall Caille. 
  • For 842, Cinaedh, son of Conra, lord of Cinel Laeghaire, was slain by the Dealbhna. 
  • For 890, Scolaighe, son of Macan, lord of Dealbhna Eathra, was slain 
  • For 1002, Mael Muadh mac Duibgilla, rí Delbna Bethra, died. 
  • For 1134, Aedh mac Maic Lochlainn h-Úi Chochlain rí Delbna Eathra, died. 
  • For 1134, Aodh mac meic Lochlainn Mécc Cochlain, tigherna Dealbhna Eathra, died. 
  • For 1142, Mac Meic Con Roí, tigherna Dealbhna Thire Dá Locha, do mharbhadh. 
  • For 1144, Cerball h-Úa Findallan, rí Delbna Móire, died. 
  • For 1160, Murchadh Ua Findolláin, tigherna Dealbhna Móire 
  • For 1168, Murchadh Ua Findalláin, tigherna Dealbhna Móiri, was slain by Diarmaid mac Donnchadha Uí Maoil Seachlainn. 
  • For 1174, Kellagh O'Finnallan, Lord of Delvin-More. 

Credit to: http://sites.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/ihm/suineill.htm

Grant By de Lacy of Delvin including the O'Finilans Territory.  CITATION

Delacy Delvin Meath

 FEUDAL NOBILITY OF WESTMEATH
"Westmeath hath many goodlie lakes and marshes of fresh water of great quantities, whereof the greatest part falleth into the Sheynon, above Athlone, and the rest into the Brosnagh, which also falleth into the Sheynon, near Mellick. It hath no noblemen in it, but the baron of Delvin, -whose name is Nugent, and under the bishop of Meath as ordinarie hereof. Whereinto is lately united by Parliament, the little diocese of Clone, in O'Meaghlin's country." —(Ireland in 1598)

DELVIN.
Its Ancient History.
The name Delvin is of Druidic origin. It is called after the Druid Delbaeth (known Lugaiahdh Delbeath—" the fine producer.") It is recorded in the History of the Dalcassian Race of Thomond that the Druid Lugaidh, the head of the sept, having been driven from his territory in the County Clare, travelled to Carn Fiachach in South Westmeath, where the son of Niall Fiacha, of the Nine Hostages was buried. When he reached the Carn, Delbaeth lighted a great fire by his druidic power. Out of this fire there rushed five streams of flame. By directions of the Druid his sons followed, one each, the streams of fire, saying at the same time that their fierv streams would bring them to their future territories. One of the streams passed into the eastern part of Westmeath where the son who followed it settled down, and the district was ever after known as Dealbhna (anglicised Delvin) from his father Dealbaeth the Druid. This story may .appear mythical and legendary, but the fact remains that the name Dealbaeth the Druid still lives in the name and the barony and village of Delvin.
After the Norman invasion the territory of Delvin passed into the hands of Hugh de Lacy who granted it to his son-in-law, Sir Gilbert de Nugent, and erected the Castle which still remains in excellent preservation in the village. Sir Gilbert de Nugent subsequently built the Castle ,of Clonyn. which was burned at the approach of Cromwell's army during the Parliamentary Wars.
About two miles from Delvin is the townland of Drumcree (Irish—Druim Craich) the name of which is of very ancient origin. It is referred to in a celebrated poem written by the great Irish poet, Cuau O'Lothchain, who lived in the eleventh century:—
Druim Criach, meeting place of a hundred hosts,
Though now a desert, thy fame fades not,
Though thou are now Druim Criaich, thou wert once Drumcree,
As well as the cold Druim Airthin, on the same day.
Druim Criaich means the hill of the sighs (Druim a hill, and Criaich—cri, the heart and ach a sigh or moan) on account of the Monarch of Tara Eochaidh having received on this hill the heads of his three sons, who had rebelled against him. This Eochaidh Ferdhlech was Monarch of Ireland about a century before Christ. Maeve, the celebrated Queen of Connaught was his daughter, He had also three sons named Tir, Fin, and Eaushna, who, when very young, were sent by their father to the great military school of the Red Branch Knights at Emania. When they had gained a thorough knowledge of the science of war they conceived the idea of seizing their father's throne, and to carry out their project they assembled a large force in Ulster and set out on their march to attack the Royal Palace of Tara. Their father, Eochaidh, having heard of their designs, advanced to meet them with a large body of the Royal troops. The opposing armies met at Drumcree, where a desperate battle ensued in which- the sons were defeated and in their flight, were captured. They were beheaded on the spot and their heads brought back to their father whose heart was deeply touched on seeing them, and from that day forward until his death he never ceased lamenting their sad fate, hence the name Drumcree, or Druim Criaich—" the hill of the sighs."
Another incident of a very historic character took place at a much later period at Drumcree. Donagh son of Flann Sinna, King of Ireland, having attacked the territory of a Chief named O'Duban of Druim Dairbreach, in the neighbourhood of Drumcree, a battle took place between them on the hill of Drumcree and O'Duban was slain. The victorious Donagh buried the vanquished Chief O'Duban on the hill and had a monument erected over him to commemorate the victory. It may be mentioned here that this Donagh was father of the celebrated Malachy II. who succeeded Brian Boru, and died in the year 1022 on Cro Innis (now Cormorant Island) Lough Ennel.
Castletown Delvin, or as it was anciently called Debhlana More, or the Great Delvin, after the name of the owner of the barony, Debhlaneth. Prior to the Anglo-Norman Invasion the barony belonged to the O' Fenolen Sept. The O'Fenolens were of remote Munster or Dalcassian origin. Their last chief in Delvin was Ceallagh or Kellagh in 1174. Since then those of the race under the modernized name of Fenolen have been in a state of obscurity and poverty, and Dr. O'Donovan adds that when he examined the barony of Delvin in 1837 he did not find many of the family in their original locality. Delvin is ten miles north-east of Mullingar, and thirty-nine miles north-west of Dublin, containing according to Lewis's Topographical Dictionary, 4,513 inhabitants, of which number 419 were living in the town. The castle which is in the village was built by Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath, for his brother-in-law, Sir Gilbert de Nugent, who resided in it for some time and then built the Castle of Clonyn, not far from Delvin, which was burnt by the Earl of Westmeath to prevent it falling into the hands of the Cromwellian soldiers during the Parliamentary War of 1641. The town in 1836 contained seventy-seven houses. The parish is situated on the road from Athboy to Drumcree, and contains 15,659 statute acres, as applotted under the Tithe Act, besides a considerable quantity of waste land. There are tracts of bog and small lakes, and limestone is abundant. Clonyn Castle, for centuries the seat of the Nugent family, is near the town and is surrounded with extensive grounds richly ornamented with timber. In 1598 the chief towns of the barony of Delvin were— Delvin, Taughmon, Drumcree, and Ballenamonie. There are no traces to be found of the last three towns named. The Nugent family played a prominent part in the history of Westmeath and of Ireland.

https://books.google.com/books?dq=annals+of+westmeath&jtp=7&id=jZ9BAAAAYAAJ#v=snippet&q=delvin&f=false

"Westmeath hath many goodlie lakes and marshes of fresh water of great quantities, whereof the greatest part falleth into the Sheynon, above Athlone, and the rest into the Brosnagh, which also falleth into the Sheynon, near Mellick. It hath no noblemen in it, but the baron of Delvin, -whose name is Nugent, and under the bishop of Meath as ordinarie hereof. Whereinto is lately united by Parliament, the little diocese of Clone, in O'Meaghlin's country." —(Ireland in 1598)

Delbna
Geoffrey Keating describes seven areas referred to as Delbna, that is Dealbhna Mhor, Dealbhna Bheag, Dealbhna Eathra, Dealbhna Iarthair Mhidhe, Dealbhna Shithe Neannta, Dealbhna Chuile Fabhair, and Dealbhna Thire da Loch in Connaught.

O'Fionnalain (Fenelon) are cited as lords of Delvin prior to the arrival of the Normans.


At least four regions in southern Uí Neill territory are denoted as Delbna. Around the 12th century these included: Mac Cochlain (Mac Coughlan) of Delbna bEthra (Garrycastle, Co. Offaly), Ua Finnallain (O'Finnallan, Fenelon) of Delbna Mor (Delvin barony, Westmeath), Ua Scolaidhe (O'Scully) of Delbna Iathair (Delvin and Rathconrath baronies, Westmeath), Ua Maoil Challan (Mulholland) in Delbna Bec (Fore barony, co. Westmeath).
In addition, Delbna regions were noted in the province of Connacht, one of those cited as Delbna of the Two Lakes (Dealbhna Thire da Loch) near the River Shannon. Reference to this is under (see
 Connaught).

 

The annals cite for Delbna:


  • For 751, The shipwreck of the Dealbhna Nuadhat on Loch Ribh, with their lord, Diumasach. 
  • For 751, The battle of Bealach Cro was gained by Crimhthann over the Dealbhna of Uí Maine, in which was slain Finn, son of Arbh, Lord of Dealbhna, at Tibra Finn, and the Dealbhna were slaughtered about him. From this are named Lochan Bealaigh Cro, and Tibra Finn. The Uí Maine were contending with them for the cantred between the Suca (the River Suck) and the Sinainn (the River Shannon), for this was called the cantred of Dealbhna [Nuadhat ]. 
  • For 827, Cearbhall, son of Finnachta, lord of Dealbhna Beathra, died. 
  • For 839, The plundering of Feara Ceall and Dealbhna Eathra by Niall Caille. 
  • For 842, Cinaedh, son of Conra, lord of Cinel Laeghaire, was slain by the Dealbhna. 
  • For 890, Scolaighe, son of Macan, lord of Dealbhna Eathra, was slain 
  • For 1002, Mael Muadh mac Duibgilla, rí Delbna Bethra, died. 
  • For 1134, Aedh mac Maic Lochlainn h-Úi Chochlain rí Delbna Eathra, died. 
  • For 1134, Aodh mac meic Lochlainn Mécc Cochlain, tigherna Dealbhna Eathra, died. 
  • For 1142, Mac Meic Con Roí, tigherna Dealbhna Thire Dá Locha, do mharbhadh. 
  • For 1144, Cerball h-Úa Findallan, rí Delbna Móire, died. 
  • For 1160, Murchadh Ua Findolláin, tigherna Dealbhna Móire 
  • For 1168, Murchadh Ua Findalláin, tigherna Dealbhna Móiri, was slain by Diarmaid mac Donnchadha Uí Maoil Seachlainn. 
  • For 1174, Kellagh O'Finnallan, Lord of Delvin-More. 

Citation - Credit to: http://sites.rootsweb.com/~irlkik/ihm/suineill.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • County Longford [6 baronies] - see  Leinster map

  • All - The territory now called Longford anciently went by the names Teathba and Teffia. North Teffia was inhabited by the Glasraidhe, descendants of early inhabitants. By the 5th century Longford was divided into north and south. The northern territory became known as Cairbre Gabhra, after Cairbre a son of Niall of the Nine Hostages. Another son received the southern half. In the 8th century the Conmaicne (e.g. O'Farrells) invaded the Ui Cairbre and by the 11th century were the dominant people as the territory became known as Annaly, and was considered part of the province of Meath. It was controlled in the north by the O'Farrel Ban (White) and in the south by the O'Farrel Buy (Yellow). Longford was formed as a county (shire) in 1576. 
  • Ardagh - was formed from the territory of Sleughtwilliam (Mostrim parish), the territory of Clangillernan (Templemichael), and from part of the church lands in the parishes of Ardagh and Ballymacormick. 
  • Granard - Anciently this was part of a territory known as Cairpre Gabra, alias Corpre Tethbae, or North Teffia. The barony was formed from the territory of Clanshane (Granard, Abbeylara, and part of Colmcille parishes), and from the territory of Slewcarberie (Clonbroney and part of Colmcille parishes). Muintir Geradhain was located on the west side of Lough Gowna, where Ó Geradhain (Gaynor or MacGinver) is mentioned as lord here in the 11th century. 
  • Longford - was formed from the territory of Moytra (Clongesh and part of Templemichael parishes), and the territory of Clan Hugh (in Killoe parish). Anciently it was part of a territory known as Cairpre Gabra, and later Muinter Anghaile (Annaly). 
  • Moydow - (Magh Dumha) Anciently it was part of a territory known as Tethba. The barony was formed from the territories of Clanawlye (Ardagh & Moydow), and parts of the territories of Moybrawne (Taghshinny parish), Clanconnor (part Kilcommock, part Cashel parishes), and Muintergalgan. 
  • Rathcline - was formed from the territories of The Callow (left bank of Shannon, Lanesboro to Ballymahon) and the territory of Clanconnor (part Kilcommoc, part Cashel). Callow is derived from the gaelic 'Caladh na hAnghaile', a former name for the barony, located between Muinter Gillagan and the river Shannon. O Fergail (O'Farrell) is noted as chief here. O'Faughny is also noted as chief of the Callow (Callo) into the 16th century. 
  • Shrule or Abbeyshrule - was formed from parts of the territories of Moybrawne (Shrule), Clanconnor and Muintergalgan. Moybrawne was anciently part of a territory known as Bregmaine, or Mag Bregmaine, in Cenél Maine. 
  • Misc - The O'Cuinn (O'Quinn) was a principal chief of Teffia and later held a small territory in Annaly centered at Rathcline. 

 

 

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