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Lord Baron of  Inchmore or Inishmore County Longford 

A Papal Island granted to Lord Delvin.

Holy Island of Inchmore in Longford Granted to Baron Delvin, Earl of Westmeath

Inchmore is the largest island in Lough Gowna - See Map Lough Gowna   (from Irish Loch Gamhna   , meaning 'calf lake') is a fresh water lake which is the uppermost lake on the River Erne   . It is located on the border between County Longford   and County Cavan  , with the largest part of the lake being in County Longford.   
 
InchmoreAtlas
 
INCHMORE or INISHMORE ISLAND (Columbkille).
We will next pay a visit to the ruins of the ancient church and monastery which was founded on the island of Inchmore, in Lough Gownagh, about the same time that St. Guasacht was made Prior of St. Mary’s, Lerha. This monastery was at one time of very large proportions, consisting of the church and the main building of the abbey. The remains of the latter are very few indeed ; yet the visitor can distinctly trace in them the various apartments of the old structure.

Columbkille contains some very beautiful scenery. The parish is out in twain with the splendid Lake of Gownagh, which stretches far into the County Cavan.

There is certainly no part of the County Longford in which one meets with such romantic scenery as this very spot; and it is recorded that when the great St. Columb determined to undertake the conversion of the Picts and Scots in the fifth century, he retired to Inchmore, in Lough Gowna, where he spent a long time in prayer and fasting preparatory to his journey. Here, too, he raised a monastery for Canons Regular before his departure for Iona, and appointed as its first abbot St. Boodan, who died in 496, or, as some writers say, 476 A.D. In 748 the abbot, Dicolla M‘Menidi, passed to his reward, being followed, in the year 800, by M‘Laisre, who, for his sanctity and piety, was called the Excellent. In 804 the dreaded Danes appeared and plundered the abbey, which they burned to the ground, and for a period of fully fifty years after their visit the place was deserted. The monastery was, however, restored in 860 by Toictuch, who became its abbot, and died in 895, according to the Annals of the Four Masters; and we do not hear of it again until April 27th, 1414, when the abbot, Edmund M‘Findbar, died, and was interred in the cemetery attached to the abbey, as were most of his predecessors. Bishop O’Farrell, from whom the Abbey of Lerha had previously been taken, was compelled also to surrender this monastery in 1543. Its remains are yet quite extensive, and are worthy of a visit from any person who desires to visit the haunts of sanctity in the early days of Catholicity in Ireland.
 

Inchmore Priory,

Lough Gowna

St Mary (from Augustinian refoundation, after 1140)
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Inismor-Loch-Gamna;
Inchymory;
Columbkille, Lough Gawna/Lough Gowna;
Teampull Choluim Cille (early church)

early monastic site, founded 6th century by

 St Colmcille
Augustinian Canons Regular (— Arroasian)?
dependent on Louth
refounded after 1140;
dissolved 1540, surrendered 8 October 1540;

occupied by Lyosagh O'Ferral by 1548, by

assignment with Sir Thomas Cusacke;
leased to James Nugent 1560

The Lough Gowna Valley

- Page 37
https://books.google.com/books?id=pqUMAQAAMAAJ
 
Frank Columb - 2002 - ‎Snippet view
For instance, in 1620, King James 1st granted 'To Mary, Lady Delvin, widow, and Sir Richard Nugent, Lord Delvin, her son...the site and etc. of the late monastery of Inchemore, otherwise Inismore, in the Annalle

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Pat. 7, Dorso. LXXXIII. 17.-—“ Grant from the King to Mary Lady Delvin, widow, and Sir Richard Nugent, Lord Delvin, her son.—Longford County. The site, &c., of the late monastery of Inchemore, otherwise Inismore, in the Annalie ; a cemetery, containing II an acre in the island of Inismore; 6 cottages and 6a. of pasture in the said island; 5 messuages, 80a. of arable, 130a. mountain pasture, 20a. wood, and 24a. bog, in Castle Richard, the demesne of said monastery; 5 cottages, 90a. arable, 60a. mountain pasture, and 12a. underwood, in Ballintoll ; rent, £6 14s. 8d., Ir. * * * in Cargaghclyevan, Cavan County, 3

pottles, lately in the occupation of Ferrall Oge McFerrall McPrior and Tirlagh Mantagh McFerrall, of Garrimore, attainted. * * * The castle, bawne, town and lands of Liserdawle, otherwise Lisserdowle, with 8 cartrons of land surrounding the same ; rent, £l.”

https://books.google.com/books?output=text&id=-gorAQAAMAAJ&dq=1620+%22James+I%22+inchemore+granted&jtp=59  

 

Inchmore 2nd Grant

 

Lough Gowna - The lake contains one large island in the south-western part, Inchmore (Inis Mór in Irish, meaning "Big island"), which was the site of a monastery founded in the sixth century by Saint Colmcille. The monastery was raided by the Vikings in 804, being burned and looted. During the twelfth century, the abbey conformed to Augustinian rules and remained there until the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII in 1543. The site was still used as a graveyard by the local population until the early years of the twentieth century. The remains of the abbey are still to be seen on the island. A fifteenth-century tower bell, reputedly from the monastery, was recovered in the nineteenth century and now hangs in the Roman Catholic church in the nearby village of Aughnacliffe.

 

 

 
InismordescriptInismor described2  

The lake contains one large island in the south-western part, Inchmore (   Inis Mór   in Irish, meaning "Big island"), which was the site of a monastery   founded in the sixth century by Saint Colmcille   . The monastery was raided by the Vikings   in 804, being burned and looted. During the twelfth century, the abbey conformed to Augustinian   rules and remained there until the dissolution of the monasteries   by Henry VIII   in 1543. The site was still used as a graveyard by the local population until the early years of the twentieth century. The remains of the abbey are still to be seen on the island. A fifteenth-century tower bell, reputedly from the monastery, was recovered in the nineteenth century and now hangs in the Roman Catholic   church in the nearby village of Aughnacliffe   .

Despite the twenty year grant the island obviously remained with the Nugent (Earl of Westmeath) family for considerably longer. A further grant recorded in the Calendar of Papal Documents state that in 1635 the Pope permitted the Earl of Westmeath to retain the property during the schism which has not ended nearly 400 years later. Thus, the papal rights legally remain with the Longford County Grants from that era.

The Papal grant was made on condition that if the schism should come to an end that the earl would restore the abbeys to whatever orders had previously held them. The Nugent estates were very considerable and quite apart from Inchmore they also held the lands of Fore which had a very large monastic site.

 Pope’s Grant of Inchmore to Westmeath 1635

Papal Grant of Inchmore to Delvin/Nugents of Longford

http://www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/environment-geography/physical-landscape/lakelands-of-westmeath/lough-ree/islands-of-lough-ree/inchmore/   

Inchmore Priory, Lough Gowna

Early monastic site, founded 6th century by St Colmcille
Augustinian Canons Regular (— Arroasian)?
dependent on Louth refounded after 1140; dissolved 1540, surrendered 8 October 1540; occupied by Lyosagh O'Ferral by 1548, by assignment with Sir Thomas Cusacke;

Granted to James Nugent 1560

Lough Gowna  (from Irish Loch Gamhna  , meaning 'calf lake') is a fresh water lake which is the uppermost lake on the River Erne . It is located on the border between County Longford and County Cavan , with the largest part of the lake being in County Longford.

 

LX. 21. — " King's letter to Sir Richard Nugent, Lord Delvin, doubting lest there might be omission or misrecital in former letters  patent, and that in order that he may securely and quietly enjoy his possessions, to have a new grant of the late dissolved monastery or  abbey of Inchmore, alias Inishmore, in the County of Longford, and the  late dissolved priory and manor of FORE or Fower, in the County of Westmeath, and all his other lands and tenements, subject to such tenures, rents, and services as they appear of record formerly to have been subject to —  

Prior Lease of Inchmore 

" Lease under letters, 10th May, IX. of Eliza- beth, to Christopher Nugent, Lord of Delvin, the site of the monastery of Inchmore in Lough gawne, and the land of the same island and Inchmore for 21 years from 1581 ; rent £6 14s. 8d. Not to alien without license under the great seal, and not to levy coyn. 30th June, IX. Eliza- beth." — Fiants of Elizabeth. 

 

Westminster, 15 July. 18th."   Citation and Reference   

On 30 June 1567 he obtained a lease of the abbey of Inchmore in the Annaly and the abbey of Forein County Westmeath, to which was added on 7 October the lease of other lands in the same county.[1]  Later Granted Forever to Mary Nugent and Lord Delvin Richard Nugent by James I 

Christopher Nugent - Wikipedia 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Nugent      

For     other people named Christopher Nugent, see Christopher Nugent (disambiguation). Sir Christopher Nugent, 6th (or 14th) Baron     Delvin (1544–1602) was an Anglo-Irish nobleman ... On 30 June 1567 he obtained a lease of the abbey     of Inchmore in the Annaly and the abbey     of Fore     in County Westmeath, to which was ... Later Granted Forever to Mary Nugent and Lord Delvin Richard Nugent by James I 

Pope’s Grant of Inchmore to Westmeath 1635 

Despite the twenty year grant the island obviously remained with the family for considerably longer. A further grant recorded in the Calendar of Papal Documents relates that in 1635 the Pope permitted the Earl of Westmeath to retain the property during the schism. The Papal grant was made on condition that if the schism should come to an end that the earl would restore the abbeys to whatever orders had previously held them. The Nugent estates were very considerable and quite apart from Inchmore they also held the lands of Fore which had a very large monastic site. 

Grant of Inchmore Pope

 

AbbeyCartron

Lough Gowna   (from Irish   Loch Gamhna   , meaning 'calf lake') is a fresh water lake which is the uppermost lake on the River Erne   . It is located on the border between County Longford   and County Cavan   , with the largest part of the lake being in County Longford.  

Below is from: Ask About Ireland - http://www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/environment-geography/physical-landscape/lakelands-of-westmeath/lough-ree/islands-of-lough-ree/inchmore/  

 
Inchmore

As its name suggests Inchmore is the largest of all the islands on Lough Ree.

It has historically part of the administrative county of Longford.

The island consists of 132 acres and 32 perches and at the time of Griffith's Valuation in 1854 it was held by the Marquis of Westmeath though we know that he did have other people resident on the island.

 

Ring-fort

On high ground at the south end of the island is a ring-fort indicating that this island knew human habitation from early times. Throughout Ireland ring-forts survived, largely due to superstition, they were often called fairy-forts and it was considered unwise to interfere unduly with them; therefore farmers worked around them rather than risk the wrath of the spirit world. In reality these ring-forts were protected enclosures for human habitation. During the early Christian period such an enclosure would have contained shelters both for man and beast. The farmers who lived here were strong farmers, possibly the family who founded or supported the local church. The original house, like the fort itself, was circular in shape with one or two living chambers. Nothing will survive except perhaps the post holes. The most likely building material would have been hazel which would have grown locally in abundance.

 

Early Monasticism

The monastic ruins on Inchmore consist of one featureless church on the north side of the island. The foundation is attributed to a fifth century monk, St. Lioban (or Liberius), the son of Lossenus.

 

Canons Regular

Some time before 1170 Inchmore had apparently become a priory of the Canons Regular of St. Augustine. The Augustinian canons became by far the most widespread religious order in 12th C. Ireland. The priory of Canons Regular of St. Augustine on Inchmore was probably dependent on the larger monastic settlement of All Saints at Saints Island, Co Longford.

 

From Church to State

In 1567 Sir Henry Sidney, Queen Elizabeth's deputy in Ireland, and the man responsible for building the first stone bridge across the Shannon at Athlone, recommended to her majesty that the Baron of Delvin, a member of the Nugent family of Westmeath, be granted Inchmore on Lough Ree. Elizabeth acceded to Sidney's request and the lands of Inchmore were granted to the Baron of Delvin for a period of twenty years.

Despite the twenty year grant the island obviously remained with the family for considerably longer. A further grant recorded in the Calendar of Papal Documents relates that in 1635 the Pope permitted the Earl of Westmeath to retain the property during the schism. The Papal grant was made on condition that if the schism should come to an end that the earl would restore the abbeys to whatever orders had previously held them. The Nugent estates were very considerable and quite apart from Inchmore they also held the lands of Fore which had a very large monastic site.

 

 

CHRISTOPHER NUGENT, eldest son of Richard lord Delvin, by Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Jenico, viscount Gormanston, and widow of Thomas Nangle, styled baron of Navan, was born in 1544. On the death of his father, which occurred 10 Dec. 1559, he succeeded to the barony. During his minority he was in ward to Thomas Radcliffe earl of Sussex.
On 12 May 1563 he was matriculated as a fellow-commoner of Clare hall.
On 3 Feb. 1563-4 the queen granted to him and his heirs male the castle of Corbetston alias Ballycorbet, with lands in Ballycorbet, Dryman, Ballythomas, Clomarrye, and Balliclog in the King's county.

He occurs as a member of Clare hall in the list of that society presented to the queen on her visit to Cambridge in August 1564. In 1565 he was knighted, and on 22 November in that year the queen sent letters to sir Henry Sidney, lord deputy of Ireland, setting forth that lord Delvin being come to his full age, personally repaired to Ireland to possess the barony descended to him from his ancestors, wherefore her majesty thought good not only to licence him to return but specially to recommend him to the lord deputy that he should have a lease in reversion for twenty-one years of the abbey of All Saints at £20 irish rent, and the custody or captainship of Sleaught-William in the Analy, which his father held during his life and his uncle had had during his minority.

It appears that in or about August 1566 Shane O'Neal encamped in Betaghes country, and there encountered lord Delvin and the gentlemen of Westmeath.


On 10 Jan. 1566-7 the lord deputy Sidney, wrote to the privy council of England highly commending the services and fidelity of lord Delvin. The queen in consequence, by letters dated 10 May 1567, recommended the lord deputy to grant his suits for leases of the abbey of Inchmore in the Analy near to Delvin, and of the abbey of Foure lying in the midst of his country in the county of Westmeath.

In the same year he articled with her majesty to extirpate the O'Mores, sons of Ferrasse Mac Rosse, and their followers. He was to serve in person in all places within the english pale and elsewhere, and to have the leading of 150 kerne, 10 horsemen, and 50 boys of his own choice.

In April 1576 he entertained the lord deputy Sidney on his progress, but in February 1578-9 we find him at the head of those who refused to acknowledge the right claimed by the government to impose without authority of parliament or a grand council, cesses or contributions for the victualling of garrisons and the lord deputy's household.

He refused to sign the proclamation against the earl of Desmond 2 Nov. 1579, and was thereupon reprimanded.
In 1581 being suspected of holding correspondence with the rebels of Leinster, he was committed to the custody of Jaques Wingfield, master of the ordnance, and subsequently sent to England and confined in the Tower of London. His innocence ultimately appearing he obtained his discharge.

He was present at sir John Perrott's parliament 26 April 1585, and afterwards going to England the queen on his return to Ireland, by letters to sir John Perrott lord deputy, dated 13th December the same year, directed that he should have a lease of the isle of All Saints in the county of Longford for thirty years after the expiration of his then term therein. We find lord Delvin's arrest mentioned in a letter of 4 Jan. 1585-6. We suspect an error in the date.
In 1593 he was appointed by commission leader of the forces raised in the county of Westmeath at the general hosting on the hill of Tarah. He, with the Nugents his kinsmen, brought 20 horsemen there.

On 7 May 1597 the queen by a privy seal ordered him a grant in fee farm of so many manors and forfeited lands in the counties of Cavan and Longford at his election as should amount to the crown rent of £100 a-year english.

In November 1599 he had a warrant from the earl of Ormond, then commanding the queen's forces in Ireland, to treat and parley with the earl of Tyrone, and instructed Thomas Leicester his lieutenant, and Matthew Archbould his servant to treat with him accordingly.
We find him serving with 150 men under lord Mountjoy against Tyrone, but being charged with succouring the rebels and with conferences had with Tyrone at his coming out of the north into Munster in the doubtful time of the siege of Kinsale, he was committed to Dublin castle, where he died in 1602. He was buried at Castleton-Delvin on 5 October. An inquisition taken at Mullengar 11 Jan. 1602-3, states that his death occurred on 17 August, but according to a MS. in Ulster's office he died on 5 September or 1 October.

He married Mary, daughter of Gerald, eleventh earl of Kildare. She survived till 1 Oct. 1610. By her he had issue: Richard, created earl of Westmeath; Christopher of Corbets-town, who died 3 July 1626; Gerald; Thomas of Dunfert in the county of Kildare, who died October 1634; Gilbert; William; Mabel, wife successively of Murrough, third baron of Inchinquin, and of John Fitzpatrick of Upper Ossory; Elizabeth, wife of Gerald, fourteenth earl of Kildare; Mary, the first wife of Anthony O'Dempsey, heir-apparent to Terence, first viscount Clanmalier, she died 1618; Eleanor, wife of Christopher Chevers, esq., of Macetown, she died 31 Aug. 1636; Margaret, wife of Fitzgerald, esq.; and
Juliana, second wife of sir Gerald Aylmer, bart. of Doneda in the county of Kildare, she died 1617.
In consequence of the troubled state of Ireland he had no benefit from queen Elizabeth's privy seal of 1597. James I., however, on 10 Aug. 1603, granted lands of £60 per annum to his widow and son. It may be hence inferred that there had been no solid foundation for the charge which occasioned his last imprisonment. He is author of:
Instructions for my Lieutenant Thomas Leicester, and my servant Matthewe Archbould to treate and parlie with Tyrone, by vertue of the right honorable the Lord Lieutenant of her Majesties Annie's authority. Dated xxv Novemb. 1599. Letter to the Lords of the council touching the proceedings of Leicester and Archbould 29 Nov. 1599. MS. Univ. Libr. Camb. Kk. 1. 15. f. 425, 427.
Arms: Erm. 2 bars G. Crest: a cockatrice rising, tail nowed ppr.
Collins's Sydney Papers, i. (2) 17, 82, 108, 236, 237- Erck's Repertory, 270, 272. Lodge's Peerage of Ireland, ed. Archdall, i. 234. The Earls of Kildare, 226, 241. Moryson's Itinerary, ii. 60, 62, 109. Nichols's Prog. Eliz. iii. 169. Strype's Annals, ii. 626. Talbot Papers, O. 327. Thomas's Hist. Notes, 1178. Cat. Uniy. Libr. M8S. iii. 585. Wright's Eliz. i. 144.

 

 


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